Exosome Enrichment Capabilities

ExosomeDx enables enrichment of exosomes directly from various biofluids to detect biomarkers of interest

 

Cells from healthy and diseased tissues shed billions of exosomes into the blood and other biofluids; the resulting total exosome content is the accumulation of exosomes contributed from all tissue. Only a fraction of these exosomes are  derived from a specific cell or tissue type.

For many projects, the total exosome content is an appropriate approach to explore the desired biology or detect a biomarker of interest. However, some projects require that exosomes be enriched from a specific tissue or cell source to focus the analysis on signals coming from targets of interest. Exosome Diagnostics has pioneered an approach to address this need: the Exosome Diagnostics Depletion or Enrichment (EDDE) platform which can enrich exosome subsets directly from biofluids.

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Exosome Enrichment

The EDDE enrichment platform utilizes  antibodies to particular exosomal proteins to bind exosomes from tissue or cell types of interest. 

EDDE enrichment is useful in a variety of assay development scenarios but has been demonstrated to be particularly useful for RNA-Seq when conducting exploratory biomarker studies and  exploring patient transcriptome profiles. EDDE enrichment prior to RNA Seq helps focus on the signal of interest and increases the likelihood  of detecting relevant biomarkers. Specific enrichment can also be useful if the biomarker of interest is expressed in multiple cell types, confounding the analysis – a common challenge faced by other non-specific liquid biopsy based methods

Exosome Depletion

EDDE depletion employs a similar workflow similar to EDDE enrichment, although negative selection is employed to remove non-relevant exosomes. As in enrichment, EDDE depletion has been proven to be  especially useful for  RNA-Seq.  EDDE depletion is also useful when specific surface biomarkers for selection are lacking but  enhance the ability to separate healthy from diseased cells.

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